List of Works

 

Choral Works

 

Jewish

 

Cantata Machzor Chayim (“Life’s Cycle”) for choir, soprano solo and organ (optional)(29')   
I wanted to describe the life of a religious Jew, viewed through prayers. I had then to choose and select from many important prayers and after a long process of reflection I chose seven of them, which represent for me the most important of them all. The cantata opens with the two first prayers that said when entering the synagogue: Mah Tovu Ohaleicha Ya’akov and Adon Olam. As the center of the cantata I chose the two prayers which are the most important in my opinion (of course, this is very subjective): t’filat 18 (of which I chose the K’dushah section), and Shma, which as the most famous and important of them all, receives the longest and most elaborate treatment. Prayers five and six are the prayers of death: Kaddish and El Male Rachamim and the cantata come to a closure with Oseh Shalom Bimromav, which represent for me the soul resting in peace in the high heavens.
 
Cantata Shma Koleinu (“Pleas for Forgiveness”) choir a cappella(27')   
My second cantata “Shma Koleinu" is for choir A Cappella. Its duration is about 28-9 minutes.
 
Cantata B’reshït ("Genesis") for a large choir, baritone solo and organ(45')   
There are of course, some famous “Creations” out there, notably that of Haydn, but as far as I know, nobody ever constructed his/her Creation the way I did: Seven days of creation and thus, seven movements, each represents a day. It starts in the most “banal” key of all: C major, but then, every movement ends in the tonality of the next movement, for it is said: “And there was evening and there was morning…” The evening comes before the morning. Thus, day one, for example, starts in C but ends in D. Day two starts in D and ends in E and so forth, each movement/day ends preparing the nest one to come. Day Seven then, the Shabbat, starts in B and ends in C, calling again for the music from the opening and thus, closing the Circle of Creation. This piece is also unique in its text: I composed it in the original language (Hebrew) and it is the exact text. No editing and no changing – each word is there, in order. As you could imagine, this cantata requires a very large choir with a high level of capabilities. It is long, in some parts difficult, and the choral part is very big (the choir sings in all seven movements). It also calls for a Baritone solo with a “Verdi” voice and a very capable organist. Still, it is worth every second of the effort…
 
Kol Nidrei – for choir, tenor solo, clarinet and string-quartet(11')   
The piece kol Nidrei was commissioned by the Copernic synagogue in Paris for a concert dedicated to this unique prayer and which took place on November 18th 2009. Seven compositions inspired by the prayer were sang/played in this concert as well as the traditional version of the prayer. From these seven, three were commissioned for this concert and had their world-premier performance there.
My kol Nidrei is for choir, tenor solo, string-quartet and clarinet. It is strongly inspired by the text and uses at some point the main musical motif from the traditional melody. I chose to compose the entire text of the prayer, since for me it is impossible to understand the meaning of the prayer without the introduction, and especially without the text that comes after the Aramaic part.
The Kol Nidrei concert was recorded and broadcast on radio France musique and a commercial CD of the entire concert is available. My piece is the last one on the CD and runs around 11 minutes.
 
Shiru la’Adonai – Psalm 96 (for soprano, choir & organ) – for choir, soprano solo and organ(11')   
A composition for choir, soprano solo and organ, Shiru Shir L’Adonai puts in music the entire chapter of Psalms 96. It is constructed in three main sections: the opening theme (sung by the choir and is very lyrical); A middle section (choir and soloist, rhythmical and energetic), and a third one which gives a big solo cadence for the soloist with an organ accompaniment (in a Jewish cantorial style). The piece closes with the opening theme, while the soloist is singing a descant. It is very melodic with a difficulty level of easy-to-medium. Its duration is around 11 minutes.
 
Shalom Aleichem – for choir a cappella(3'30'')   
A small contrapuntal composition in four voices (SATB). The text is the famous prayer Shalom Aleichem Mal’achei Hasharet. I also composed this text, which is one of my favorites, into two songs.
 
Pot-Pourri de Chanouka (Chanukah Medley) – for female voices (SSA)(6')   
My Chanuka Medleyis as joyful as this lovely holiday is, but also, as the holiday iteself (which has some tragic stories of heroic bravery), it has some moments of drama. I chose six famous Israeli Chanuka-songs for this medley, arranging them into three-voice female choir, accompanied by the piano. I play with the with the ryhthms, with the harmonies, with the different voices... Sometimes I mix several of them together, sometimes breaking the meter or the pulse... this piece, which is about six minute-long, had its first peformances on december 2010 where I conducted my choir Choeur de Chambre de la Cité in two public concerts in Paris. It had great success with the public and the singers alike.
 
Ani Ma’amin – for a choir (three voices)(10')   
Chanukah Medley (SSA & SATB) (6')   
Two version of a Chanukah Medley. The SSA is published by Transcontinental Music Pub. and can be bought directly on their website. The SATB version is a little bit shorter (only 4 minutes) and keeps the character and the important parts of the SSA version.
 
Al Naharot Bavel #1 (for two choirs, violin & piano) (13')   
For two choirs, violin & piano. Performed at the Jewish Fetival of Alsace in May 23, 2013 with the choir Les Polyphonies Hébraïques de Strasbourg. The composition was wonderfully received by the singers, the public and the media, which called it in its review: "13 minutes of musical happiness."
 
Al Naharot Bavel #2 (choir a cappella) (7' 45)   
An a cappella composition, with several sections that are following the text closely. Very beautiful but needs a rather good group. Has not been performed yet.
 
Al Naharot Bavel #3 (mezzo, choir & piano) (3' 30'')   
A light, Waltz-like version of this psalms 137, with two versions: One for choir SATB and piano and the other with mezzo-soprano soloist. Premiered at the Copernic Synagogue in May 2013 with the wonderful mezzo Anna Wall as soloist.
 
Psalms 100 – Mizmor l’Toda (SATB & piano) (3')   
Written in September 2012 for choir and piano. The text is taken from the Book of Psalms (#100, 1-3) and the music is energetic, lively and rhythmic with a good piano part giving the necessary "spice".
 
Psalms 130 – Shir Hama’alot (SATB & piano) (4' 30'')   
I wrote Shir Hama'alot for my choir at the synagogue Copernic in February 2012. The music is happy, melodic and fairly simple, though some of the voice-entrances are unexpected and needs attention from the singers. The piano part demands a capable pianist (like in most of my pieces...).
 
Yotzer (for two choirs, two horns & two trombones) (8' 30'')   
Based on the beautiful prayer of Yotzer, this radiant and happy composition is written for two choirs (large and small), but could be prefectly done as well with one choir and four solosits. The instrumentation is unusual: two horns and two trombones which have independent lines. Therefore, at the beautiful choral at the end, there are 12 different voices singing/playing together and they all bring it to a ravishing and grand conclusion. It is around eight and a half minutes and was premiered to a great success at the Copernic synagogue in Paris, April 2012.
 

 

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General

 

Demain, dès l’aube (SATB)  (Poem by Victor Hugo) – for choir a cappella(4')   
A setting of Victor Hugo's famous poem for the memory of his daughter who has drowned in tragic circumstances. The piece is still waiting for its first performance.
 

 

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Arrangements

 

Oseh Shalom (traditional) – arrangement for three female voice    
Tzur Mishelo Achalnu (traditional) – arrangement for three female voice    
Yedid Nefesh (traditional) – arrangement for three female voice    

 

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Songs on Jewish Themes

 

High Holidays

 

Elohai Neshamah     
Hineni (for bass/baritone & organ) (The entire prayer, to be sung at the service)    
This is for the service of Yom-Kippur. It is the entire prayer in music and is very melodic and very moving.
 
How Greatly We Are Blessed     
Or Zaru’a laTzadik     
Sh’ma Koleinu #1 (prayer version)(3'15'')   
Sh'ma Koleinuis one of my favorit prayers and I composed it twice into songs as well as using it as the closing movement in my second cantata. This cantorial-song-version is the opening number in the CD Sh'ma Koleinu which I recorded with soprano Aviva Timonier (The CD can be downloaded from this website). It is free and improvisatory, very much like the cantorial singing and is accompanied minimally by the piano in order not to distract the ear from the beautiful melody and the strong text.
 
Sh’ma Koleinu #2 (song version, Hebrew and English)    
Sh'ma Koleinuis one of my favorit prayers and I composed it twice into songs as well as using it as the closing movement in my second cantata. Here, the second version of this moving prayer is one of my best songs ever - powerful, moving , dramatic and full with bursting emotions. The first time it appears in the original Hebrew version, then the second time in English (translation by Aviva Timonier). The singer must have a good voice - this song is rather challenging vocally!
 
Tov l’Hodot la’Adonai     
An’im Zmirot     

 

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Shabbat

 

Kiddush leShabbat     
L’chah Dodi     
Mizmor Shir leYom haShabbat     
Shabbat Shalom (Text: Itai Daniel, in English)    
Vayevarech Elohim Et Yom haShvi’iy     
Vaichulu Hashamayim #1     
Vaichulu Hashamayim #2     
Veshamru     
Yih’yu l’Ratzon     
Hevenu Shalom Aleichem (for two-voice choir & piano) (4')   
For a two-voice group (women/men) and piano. Light, bouncy, energetic and up-beat, this song will get the choir and audience alike dancing and smiling. A "hit song" that we use as a wonderful encore to our concerts.
 

 

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Weddings

 

Hinech Yafah Ra’ayati     

 

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Synagogue

 

El Male Rachamim     
Hevenu Shalom Aleichem (two-voice choir & piano) - for two voices    
Lakol Zman Ve’et (G minor)    
Oseh Shalom Bimromav (from Cantata Machzor Chayim)    
Shalom Aleichem #1 (A Flat Major)    
Shalom Aleichem #2 (G Minor)    
Shalom Rav Al Yisrel Amcha     
Shir Lama’alot     
Sim Shalom     
MySim Shalom has some very interesting (and unexpected) harmonic progressions and a lovely melody. It is upbeat, joyous and has a great piano part.
 
Why     
Yedid Nefesh #1 (slow)    
Yedid Nefesh #2 (fast)    
Hevenu Shalom Aleichem (for two-voice choir & piano) (4')   
For a two-voice group (women/men) and piano. Light, bouncy, energetic and up-beat, this song will get the choir and audience alike dancing and smiling. A "hit song" that we use as a wonderful encore to our concerts.
 
Yotzer (for two choirs, two horns & two trombones) (8' 30'')   
Based on the beautiful prayer of Yotzer, this radiant and happy composition is written for two choirs (large and small), but could be prefectly done as well with one choir and four solosits. The instrumentation is unusual: two horns and two trombones which have independent lines. Therefore, at the beautiful choral at the end, there are 12 different voices singing/playing together and they all bring it to a ravishing and grand conclusion. It is around eight and a half minutes and was premiered to a great success at the Copernic synagogue in Paris, April 2012.
 

 

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Songs

 

Classical

 

Voice/Piano

 

 

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Piano

 

Piano sonata #1 (29')   
I began working on my first piano sonata during the summer of 2008, while staying in the country-house of friends in the beautiful region of Beaujolais. I completed it exactly a year later at the same place. What I had in mind was to write a piece that will give homage and respect to a long list of great piano sonatas from the past, many of them are among the most beautiful, sophisticated and beloved pieces of music we have today. As a pianist myself, I also aimed for a piece that will be a joy to play, that will be emotionally engaging and that could be interpreted in many different ways and moods. In other words - a piece that will give the pianist a vast opportunity for self-expression, imagination and interpretation. The first movement of the sonata is in the traditional sonata-form. It has two themes that differ in character: the first one has a philosophical, thoughtful nature and without any tonal centre, whiles the second - lyrical and quite tonal. A large development section then follows, taking many of the elements from the two main themes and develops them. After reaching a climax, it bridges into the recapitulation section where the two themes return, with some obvious alterations. It is then concluded by a short coda. The second movement has a very loose form, consisting of several sections which are like a set of distant memories. Its mood is sombre, even tragic. It has a reminiscent and melancholic feeling to it and a thread of sadness is weaved into its melodic lines. Then, and evolving directly from it, the third movement starts, with a burst of energy, decisiveness and optimism. This is by far the most tonal movement and its robust and percussive rhythm brings to mind some of the piano-works of Prokofiev. The movement is constructed in the large form of A-B-A, with a middle section (B) in a contrasting mood, based on a whole-note scale. After the repeat of the “A” section, the sonata ends in a mood of exhilaration, optimism and excitement.
 
Toccata (4')   
Difficult, impressive and full with rythmic energy, this toccata is a great tour de force for a pianist to end a recital or as an encore.
 

 

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Cello/Piano

 

Elégie (cello & piano)     
This Élégie is homage to the famous Élégie by Gabriel Fauré, composed for the same setting. It is very “classical”, melodic and is much fun to play. It is on Youtube and can be listened to the recording from a concert I had in 2011 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUOlqZV0jK0)
 

 

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Flute

 

Flute sonata (flute solo) (15')   
Was written in the memory of Ofir Daniel, who was an excellent player of the instrument in his youth. The piece is very emotional and has four movements. It is scheduled to have its first performance in 2014.
 

 

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